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Letters to the Editor: August 9, 2017

'Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain'

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Size Doesn't Matter

A note to Pat Morris (Letters, Aug. 2), who was trying to compare the Bohemian to the Sonoma County Gazette: It's not how many pages, my friend, but what's on the pages.

Occidental

Pay No Attention

When Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion finally get to the Land of Oz, they have to navigate their way to a meeting with the "all-powerful" wizard in his castle. They state their case of wanting his assistance to transport Dorothy back home, but are dismissed rudely by his intimidating image on a screen before them. With an amplified voice, he sets off explosions, fire and smoke, all in an effort to frighten them to flee.

But it is Toto, Dorothy's pet dog, to the rescue as he pulls back the curtain to show a little man (who can't possibly be the almighty wizard?), operating the various control panels, wheels, etc., to portray his "image." Their discovery elicits a most disingenuous response: "Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain."

Since Donald Trump has been in office, he has fired staff and had appointees tender their resignations—and even had candidates decide against accepting appointments in his administration. He has managed to frustrate, anger and generally alienate cabinet members, Congress, the nation's police departments—and let us not forget the Boy Scouts!

Yet Mr. Trump's response seems to be taken straight from the "powerful" Oz's character and script—pay no attention to what is unfolding at the White House; contrary to what you are seeing, "there is no White House chaos, everything is running fine." This is becoming a rather bizarre situation as we all scratch our heads and wonder in unison—what is this man not seeing that everyone else is?

But what is truly frightening is that the script Mr. Trump may be operating under is not the childhood fantasy of L. Frank Baum, but the George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984, where everything is the opposite of what is seen and heard—in other words, Trump's own fake news.

Santa Rosa

End of the Road

I think that this article may seem logical to some, but to others it is just folly ("Eternity 2.0", July 12). My supposition is that life is eternal anyway and that much of what we choose to manifest in this lifetime or the next is usually in sync with the metaphor we are currently living out. Mine included. This does not mean that I am in denial of the finality of death as some would choose to believe.

Via Bohemian.com

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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